A few turbulent days in Germany but well worth it..

It has been a hard few days. We left at the crack of dawn, well earlier actually, to get our flight to Hannover for our flying visit to Duderstadt for treatment with Dr Nesselhut. It was beautiful weather there and everything seemed great. We had good food and even better great company. On walking into our hotel we immediately met a wonderful Australian couple who were so pleased to speak to some English speaking people! Within minutes we had discovered that they were there for cancer treatment also. It was for their 29 year old daughter who has glioblastoma multiforme or GBM. This is a brain tumour that is aggressive and hard to treat and actually life threatening and shortening. Their daughter wasn’t given many months to years to live but defying all odds she is still well and all clear about three years on. This is down to her drive but also her families undenying love and passion to save her life. The father and mother have dedicated their lives to caring for her. Her father, Tony has done everything in his power and super skills at research to find the best possible treatments for her whilst her mother, Lyn has helped with injections and general caring. What a powerhouse. You can feel their love and boy you don’t want to mess with them!

Jenny, their daughter has had some radical surgery amongst some radical treatments but has come out of it well and currently all clear. That is why they were at Dr Nesselhuts’ and the Hallwang clinic. Their research continues and the treatment is there to find out what is actually causing the canSer.

We felt honoured to meet and spend time with them. They were genuinely very kind and were sharing so much information. Tony thinks that canSer is caused by either a bacterial or virus within the body. It affects the immune system and hides there. So despite treatments to eliminate the tumour it isn’t curing the cause. And that is what they were on a mission to find out. Jenny has had the RGCC test and is finding that a virus is harbouring in her system. This really does resonate with me.

I certainly believe that our bodies created canSer therefore it should be able to get rid of it. Therefore an antidote or treatment to get to grips with those sneaky canSer cells would be logical.

On Sunday night after a lovely evening with my hubby I woke at 2am. I hadn’t been for treatment yet and was feeling very shaky and sweaty. I felt like I was coming down with the flu yet had terrible upset tummy and sickness. Our thoughts were food poisoning but Pete had eaten the same as me. Whatever it was it made me feel awful for a good few days. I was determined to have treatment but knew that having Newcastle disease virus wouldn’t make me feel much better. So for the last few days I have been a bit of a wreck. I haven’t been able to stomach anything other than green tea and water. (And even the green tea I think was causing me issues.)

Yesterday we met with DR Nesselhut Senior. He is simply such a lovely guy. He always seems so positive and explained that the vaccination I was having was quite a risky one. Now they tell me! Apparently research shows that the antibodies they were using in a larger dose caused 20% remission, 40% stable disease and 40% death! Oh joy… Pete and I looked at each other- telepathically thinking we have time to get up and run! He also explained that in that dosage the cost was 100,000 Euros. But then the Doc explained that in such a small dose the cost was clearly far less and the response would be completely different… they hope!

I didn’t run and I am still here currently fine…

We were advised when speaking to Dr Hembry last week that we shold mention ‘antisense’ to Dr Nesselhut. Not really knowing much about it we did. Here is a link to general terms of what it is; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antisense_therapy

He said that he didn’t believe that breast canSer was caused by a virus but more by a bacterial infection that goes in through the nipple. I guess that makes sense. But we all know that triple negative seems to be tricky and nothing is really the norm when it comes to TNBC.  That said I had my blood taken to have a range of blood tests to see if I have any virus harbouring inside my body. No doubt it will be pricey but it would be interesting to know what is happening inside of me.

We travelled to the airport and made our way home. I long for home when I feel poorly. My bed was calling me and after a (bad) night’s sleep I do actually feel better. I don’t have cramps any more but do feel a bit light headed. I don’t think I will be exercising today but I do want to start eating.

There is much to be done, especially for Pete. He is trying so hard to run his business successfully and raise enough funds for treatments. But it is all worthwhile. As long as I can stay well and have options ahead of me then its great news.

Dr Nesselhut gave us an analogy of the different kinds of input we as ‘incurable’ canSer patients are give from ‘regular’ doctors. A man wants to climb a mountain. At the bottom the guide says, ‘You won’t make it. Don’t risk it’. The man climbs and gets half way to a hut for a drink. The bar man says, ‘You won’t make it to the summit, you will never do it’.

But, what if the guide at the bottom says, ‘You can do this, you can make it to the top.’ Then at the hut, the bar man says, ‘you’re halfway, you can reach the summit, keep going!’

Dr Nesselhut became very animated and was very passionate about it. Bless him. We understood loud and clear what he wants us to do. I won’t give up. I just cope better when I’m not feeling yucky from a stomach upset!

All in all it was a very successful trip and the highlight was meeting our new friends. We hope to see them again someday with hopefully amazing news.

 

                  Out for a lovely walk in Duderstadt.

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